Be Like George

We have a six month old golden doodle puppy named George. He is addicted to chasing the red light of a laser pointer we have. Let’s just say that it is so bad that when we misplace the laser pointer or the batteries die, finding the pointer or getting new batteries becomes priority number one in our household. When he wants the pointer and there is no pointer, it is a pretty pathetic situation (yes I get that the dog has trained us – don’t judge).

At any rate, the pointer does come in handy when we want to distract George, get him to go outside, wear him out with some good running, or get him to go where we want him to go.

Last night as he was chasing the red light around and around the backyard and through the house, it dawned on me that the American people are a lot like George and our president’s tweets are a lot like a laser pointer distracting us, running us around and wearing us out, and getting us to go where he wants us to go.

Funny thing about our puppy George though; as he is growing up he has figured out that sometimes we use the laser pointer to get him to go places he doesn’t necessarily want to go, like outside or behind his dog gate when we need a break. When George sees the red light going someplace he does not want to go, he quits following it, and he looks up at us with that “are you kidding me” look, and we have to be more creative in getting him to go where we want him to go.

Perhaps we the American people across the political spectrum can learn something from George. Sometimes people try to get us to go places we don’t want to go, and as we grow up we don’t have to follow the little red light of the president’s tweets taking us places where we neither want to go nor should be going.

Perhaps we should try not following the red light of his tweets altogether. I mean let’s get outside and take some walks, throw a tennis ball, or play some frisbee. We can do this America. Be like George (except please don’t eat socks). Stop going where this man wants to take us.

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About Mark Y. A. Davies

Mark Davies is The Wimberly Professor of Social and Ecological Ethics and Director of the World House Institute for Social and Ecological Responsibility at Oklahoma City University. From 2009 to 2015, Mark was dean of the Petree College of Arts and Sciences and Wimberly Professor of Social Ethics at Oklahoma City University. Previously, Mark was dean of the Wimberly School of Religion at Oklahoma City University and Founding Director of the Vivian Wimberly Center for Ethics and Servant Leadership. Prior to becoming dean of the Wimberly School of Religion in 2002, he was associate dean of the Petree College of Arts and Sciences at Oklahoma City University and chair of the department of philosophy. Mark has published in the areas of Boston personalism, process philosophy and ethics, and ecological ethics. Dr. Davies serves on the United Methodist University Senate, which is “an elected body of professionals in higher education created by the General Conference to determine which schools, colleges, universities, and theological schools meet the criteria for listing as institutions affiliated with The United Methodist Church.” He and his wife Kristin live in Edmond, OK in the United States, and they have two daughters. The views expressed by the author in this blog do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma City University.
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One Response to Be Like George

  1. Ann Salazar says:

    So perfect!!

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