Guest Blog – THE HUMAN COMMUNITY FACES OF SYSTEMIC TRANSFORMATION: A NEW COMMUNITY FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

Earthrise_Revisited_2013

(This is the third and final guest blog post by Bill Parker from his paper titled “The Human Community Network: An Experimental Community.”)

What follows is a chart that lays out the Human Community Faces of Systemic Transformation. There are three components to this transformation consisting of:

  • the transition to a re-generative form of capitalism which is designed to eliminate economic corruption, correct the level of worker equity, reclaim lost human resources, and reframe ecological innovations.
  • the establishment of effective civic engagement which is achieved through engaging and networking local citizenry, equipping emerging generations of leaders, initiating institutional reformulation, and interconnecting networks of movements.
  • the re-imagination of our diverse social fabric that is recovered in the total public education mission, recovered mission of the faith communities, and the recognized interdependency of all faith traditions in an environment of peace, plus socially and ecologically grounded academic curriculum in universities.

It is necessary for each Face to have certain processes within it to develop a strategy for:

  1. Ecological responsibility targeted for an effective systemic resolve which will unite the forces of transformation,
  1. Develop models and designs for systemic change,
  1. Initiate citizen awakenment and engagement,
  1. Focus on art in multiple forms to take the new framework for society to the emotional fulfilling levels for sustainability.

These factors are an essential part of each Face in order to address the human-centered externalities. Comprehensiveness is the most effective method for addressing the unintended consequences of a given direction. It is a matter of extreme importance that all involved understand the basic non-violence and non-cooperative resistance tenets and practices. These tenets and practices are disciplines needed to face the uncertain realities that may arise and to illustrate the peaceful nature of the interdependent human community. 

THE FACES OF SYSTEMIC ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION: A NEW ECONOMIC PROCESS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY 

I. TRANSITION TO A RE-GENERATIVE FORM OF CAPITALISM 

a. ERADICATE ECONOMIC CORRUPTION

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: WEALTH CONSOLIDATION

  1. Define Corporation Limits
  2. Redesign Community Banking
  3. Redirect Corporate Welfare
  4. Review Ethical Networks  

b. ESTABLISH WORKER EQUITY

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: UNDER REPRESENTATION

  1. Rejuvenate Worker Organizations
  2. Re-focus Professional Guilds
  3. Re-establish Cooperative Networks
  4. Integrate Wealth Participation  

c. RECLAIM LOST HUMAN RESOURCES

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: PRIVATE FOR-PROFIT PRISONS

  1. Ensure Comprehensive Health Care
  2. Reconstitute Prisoner Rehabilitation
  3. Abolish Human Trafficking and Slavery

Redefine Drug Rehabilitation Methods 

d. REFRAME ECOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: REDUCED SCALE

  1. Establish Sustainable Residential Practices
  2. Develop Sustainable Business Network Systems
  3. Expand Transportation Energy Alternatives
  4. Demonstrate Local and Organic Food Viability 

THE FACES OF SYSTEMIC CIVIC TRANSFORMATION: A NEW POLITICAL PROCESS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY 

II. ESTABLISH EFFECTIVE CIVIC ENGAGEMENT 

a. ENGAGE AND NETWORK LOCAL CITIZENRY

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: DEMORALIZED SELF IMAGE

  1. Empower local voices
  2. Initiate Inter-faith Youth Service
  3. Formulate Local Comprehensive Development
  4. Transform Localized Institutional Response  

b. PREPARE EMERGING GENERATION LEADERS

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: BUSINESS PARADIGM

  1. Broaden Ethnic Leadership Formation
  2. Reframe Civic Leadership Pedagogy
  3. Integrate Principles of Organizational Effectiveness
  4. Expand Methods for Secular Activists 

c. INITIATE INSTITUTIONAL REFORMULATION

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: STRUCTURAL STAGNATION

  1. Re-contextualize Government Function
  2. Recover Public Civic Education
  3. Interlink Civic Associations
  4. End Unfair Corporate Influences 

d. INTERCONNECT NETWORK OF MOVEMENTS

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: MISSIONAL SEGMENTATION

  1. Establish a Democratic Participation Method
  2. Connect Activists Engagement Systems
  3. Integrate Service Sector Focus
  4. Bring Intentionality to Informal Social Networks 

THE FACES OF SYSTEMIC CULTURAL TRANSFORMATION: A NEW CULTURAL PROCESS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY 

III. RE-IMAGINATION OF THE DIVERSE SOCIAL FABRIC 

a. TOTAL PUBLIC EDUCATION – Student Focused

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: TEST DRIVEN TEACHING

  1. Recover the Teacher Vocation
  2. Re-establish the Learning Environment
  3. Intensify Civics Curriculum
  4. Focus on Early Child Development 

b. FAITH BASED INSTITUTIONS – Recovered Missional Focus

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: INSTITUTIONALISM

  1. Enable Laity Understanding of their Faith
  2. Equip Clergy With Methods
  3. Integrate Focus of Faith Institutions
  4. Re-generate Foundational Social Roles 

c. CELEBRATE THE INTERDEPENDENT COMMUNITY PRESENCE

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: RELIGIOUS BIGOTRY

  1. Initiate Joint Ventures of Solidarity
  2. Organize Common Service Engagement
  3. Design Common Core Curriculum
  4. Integrate Community Responses 

d. SOCIAL AND ECOLOGICAL GROUNDING OF ACADEMIC CURRICULUM

SYMBOLIC OF THE PROBLEM: KNOWLEDGE SEGMENTATION

  1. Establish a Methods Curriculum
  2. Connect Student Engagement Systems
  3. Nurture Faculty Mentoring Roles
  4. Demonstrate Covenanted Community Life
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About Mark Y. A. Davies

Mark Davies is The Wimberly Professor of Social and Ecological Ethics and Director of the World House Institute for Social and Ecological Responsibility at Oklahoma City University. From 2009 to 2015, Mark was dean of the Petree College of Arts and Sciences and Wimberly Professor of Social Ethics at Oklahoma City University. Previously, Mark was dean of the Wimberly School of Religion at Oklahoma City University and Founding Director of the Vivian Wimberly Center for Ethics and Servant Leadership. Prior to becoming dean of the Wimberly School of Religion in 2002, he was associate dean of the Petree College of Arts and Sciences at Oklahoma City University and chair of the department of philosophy. Mark has published in the areas of Boston personalism, process philosophy and ethics, and ecological ethics. Dr. Davies serves on the United Methodist University Senate, which is “an elected body of professionals in higher education created by the General Conference to determine which schools, colleges, universities, and theological schools meet the criteria for listing as institutions affiliated with The United Methodist Church.” He and his wife Kristin live in Edmond, OK in the United States, and they have two daughters. The views expressed by the author in this blog do not necessarily represent the views of Oklahoma City University.
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